Tag Archives: curriculum

How Long Should Our Homeschool Day Be?

There is a lot of speculation regarding exactly what a homeschool day ought to look like and how long it should take for daily lessons. There are as many answers as there are families who homeschool. When clients ask me how long their day should take, there are several factors I ask them to consider.

 

What age/stage/grade is your child?

Consider your child’s age, grade level, and developmental stage. If your child is 4 or 5, consider using play, co-op groups, and field trips more than seatwork. These activities are more developmentally appropriate and foster social skills. If your child is 7 but cannot sit still for more than 5 minutes, you may need less in seat and more hands-on activities. You may also need to give your child the option to choose from a variety of activities rather than using traditional homeschool workbooks and curriculum. If your child is 16 and wants to participate in dual enrollment, you may utilize study guides or tutors for a portion fo the week to help brush up on skills needed to pass entrance tests. This may add a couple of hours per week to your child’s schedule.

Replicating public or private school is not the same as homeschooling.

Many families choose to use options like online public school or flex online schooling. If this works for your child, especially if you can pick and choose which courses while leaving courses not needed/wanted, then you are set. Sometimes this option is a good match. However, there are many students who end up spending so much time on these courses that they end up with very little time for real-world experiences such as playing with friends, trips to the library, field trips, and more. Remember that busy work, repetition without need for practice within a subject, is not a part of best practices in education. Practice is good. Too much practice of a topic one already knows can cause regression and discourage interest in learning.

Does your child have special needs?

If your child has special needs, consider the topics which may need to take a little more time versus a little less time in your school day. Also, consider how much time needs to be spent working with a therapist for those special needs. Add in the need for your child to have breaks to play, relax, and pursue their interests. Consider all fo these factors when looking at how much time is spent on schoolwork.

What are your child’s interests?

Does your child love to complete art projects? Does she write all day for fun? Does he enjoy sports? Think about how frustrating it is to never have time to participate in your hobbies. Kids need time to explore new hobbies and find out what they enjoy doing. One of the pros of homeschooling is that you can provide this opportunity for your child. They do not have to wait for a class full of students to sit quietly or finish a task before moving on. Homeschooling moves faster so you can offer more free time to your child.

 

Everyone needs a break.

Adults needs time off of work. So do kids. We all need a break sometime whether going on a vacation or simply staying home to enjoy a quiet afternoon while we relax from a long week. I know when I haven’t had enough time to relax. I become grumpy and feel tired. If I take the time to relax a little each day, I feel less grumpy and have more energy. Kids have similar issues when they don’t get enough time off from organized tasks like schoolwork. You may see behavior issues, difficulty with sleep, or other issues popping up if there is not enough free time.

So exactly how long should a school day be for a homeschooler?

There is no exact amount of time you must work on organized homeschool activities unless you live in a state or province which mandates a specified amount of time per day, month, or year. Most homeschoolers spend 1-4 hours a day on schoolwork. Younger children tend to spend 1-2 hours a day while older kids (middle and high schoolers usually) may spend closer to 2-4 hours per day on organized schoolwork activities. Keep in mind that there are also unstructured activities like sports, park days, co-op classes, game days, field trips, and more which do not factor in to the times I mentioned above. In the end, you have to decide what works best for your child. If something is not working, then take a break or try a different option whether that means a different curriculum or less/more time spent on homeschool activities.

 

 

For evaluations and consultations, contact Melissa, The Reading Coach!

Melissa Packwood, M.S. Ed. Photograph by Alexandra Islas

Melissa Packwood, M.S. Ed.
Photograph by Alexandra Islas

 

I earned my master’s degree in reading and literacy as well as an ESE graduate certificate. I hold a current teaching certificate and am working on my dissertation for my PhD in general psychology. As a consultant and reading coach, I focus on early childhood education, elementary education, reading and literacy, study skills, thematic units, and social skills. Additional services include public speaking, transcript preparation, and more. I look forward to putting my teaching experience and degrees to work for you.

Please contact me with questions or to request services.

You can also contact Melissa, The Reading Coach at 407-712-4368

Which Curriculum is Best for Homeschooling a Child in Kindergarten?

 

Every day when I log into social media homeschool groups, I see people asking how to begin homeschooling and which curriculum is best for their 5 or 6-year-old child. This is a really good question, especially given the fact that public schools tend to push standards-based education options rather than diverse developmentally appropriate education options. Sadly, not all kids will be ready for the curriculum given in kindergarten and first grade.

This is one reason why some parents homeschool or unschool. There is more freedom of choice in home and unschooling options, plus some children do better when not being pushed to learn at the pace state standards push.

Some states do require a written educational plan or for you to declare a curriculum. I encourage you to seek out support from your local homeschool organizations and groups in order to find the best options if that is your situation. However, if this is not a requirement for you, then you get to choose what is best for your little one.

Keep in mind that, at the ages of 5 and 6, your child needs less of a curriculum and more free play time. When we push curriculum and sitting at a table writing before a child is ready, our sweet kids tend to regress and dislike learning. Sometimes a child will want to use worksheets or a full curriculum which it okay as well, but should not be the main focus just yet.

Using activities like puzzles, outdoor time, visits to museums and libraries, play groups and park days, and other hands-on activities. These activities help children to learn social skills, motor skills, and learn to love learning. Add in reading aloud to your child and go at your own pace options (when ready) like ABC Mouse or Reading Eggs and you have a recipe for success.

When asked, my advice is to begin slowly. Focus on social skills, play, and hands-on learning. Work as a team to choose activities your child will enjoy and from which he will learn. Adjust as your child’s needs, maturity, and interests change. Add in more structured activities as your child grows and learns.

Together you can do this! I believe in you.

 

For evaluations and consultations, contact Melissa, The Reading Coach!

Melissa Packwood, M.S. Ed. Photograph by Alexandra Islas

Melissa Packwood, M.S. Ed.
Photograph by Alexandra Islas

 

I earned my master’s degree in reading and literacy as well as an ESE graduate certificate. I hold a current teaching certificate and am working on my dissertation for my PHD in general psychology. As a consultant and reading coach, I focus on early childhood education, elementary education, reading and literacy, study skills, thematic units, and social skills. Additional services include public speaking, transcript preparation, and more. I look forward to putting my teaching experience and degrees to work for you.

Please contact me with questions or to request services.

You can also contact Melissa, The Reading Coach at 407-712-4368

Minecraft Units Review – Mathcraft and Writecraft

I was recently asked to give an honest review of Mathcraft and Writecraft products created by Robins Creative Content, LLC in exchange for free access to the products reviewed. The products are titled Mathcraft Geometry: Angles, Mathcraft Geometry: Area and Perimeter, and Writecraft. If you have older children, you may already be familiar with Minecraft, a video game that many children are using for fun and to learn. These materials are styled in a way that piques the interest of those children who enjoy Minecraft. There are graphics and lessons which bring Minecraft into the mix.

Having fun while learning is the goal!

Having fun while learning is the goal!

As I downloaded and printed the files, my four year old began jumping up and down. He was eager to try the lessons even though they were geared to kids his older sisters’ age. He was able to work on the lessons with my help and he enjoyed every minute of it. This was very impressive because he tends to resist paper and pencil activities, but needs more practice with his fine motor skills. My two older children were interested, but held back a bit because they knew it was school related and they were not yet sure what I was doing.

Mathcraft Geometry: Angles was fun! I enjoyed it and the kids enjoyed it, too. The graphics helped explain different types of angles in a way that related to prior knowledge. My children couldn’t wait to finish the lessons, then get on the computer and show me what they learned. They made simple buildings using the concept of angles, then worked on larger structures for fun. That is what I can a fabulous student-led extension!

Put your knowledge into action!

Put your knowledge into action!

Mathcraft Geometry: Area and Perimeter was interesting because there were lessons to complete, but also there was enough free choice involved that my middle child, who usually resists being told what to do, was happy to oblige. The information was easy to understand and relatable to the children.

Hands on activities help us learn.

Hands on activities help us learn.

Writecraft was great all around. There were writing ideas, also known as prompts, included in this packet. My children enjoyed choosing their topics and perfecting their writing using the tips in the lessons. There was even lined paper with Minecraft style graphics included in the packet. That made everything more interesting for the children.

One of my children chose to create a chart using one of the prompts.

One of my children chose to create a chart using one of the prompts.

If you would like to purchase these resources, check out the information and link below. I think that if you have a Minecraft player in your home, you will want this product!

The units will be available and on sale for $4.99 on Friday, December 12, 2014 !

Click here to order Mathcraft and Writecraft.

Ages: 8-12

Grades: 3-7

Regular Price: $7.99

Sale Price $4.99